Quotations of Wisdom

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Robert F Kennedy

Few will have the greatness to bend history; however, each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope... and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance [Q1954]

Buckminster Fuller

While my contemporaries were looking how to make a living, I decided to focus on what needed to be done for society. [Q130]

Adlai Stevenson II

The real patriots are those who love America as she is, but who want the beloved to be more lovable. This is not treachery. This, as every parent, every teacher, every friend must know, is the truest and noblest affection. [Q1846]

Richard P. Feynman

It's because someone knows something about it that we can't talk about physics. It's the things that nobody knows about that we can discuss. We can talk about the weather; we can talk about social problems; we can talk about psychology; we can talk about international finance... so it's the subject that nobody knows anything about that we can all talk about! [Q971]

John Boyd Orr

The real evil of the Russian communist state is not communism. It is the secret police and the concentration camp. [Q1155]

Isaac Newton

If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants. [Q368]

Oliver Wendell Holmes

Why can't somebody give us a list of things that everybody thinks and nobody says, and another list of things that everybody says and nobody thinks. [Q1091]

Voltaire

We have a natural right to make use of our pens as of our tongue, at our peril, risk and hazard. [Q1306]

Senator Paul Simon

It was great to see many long-time friends, including Dick Cheney who had his office next to mine when we were House members. He has served the nation superbly in several capacities. He now heads the Halliburton Corporation. (From Simon's Autobiography published in 1999 prior to the George W. Bush / Dick Cheney presidency). [Q1831]

Senator Paul Simon

Beecher and two others had been tried for heresy in the local presbytery in 1833 for "their liberal theology." Central to the charge was their antislavery stand. [Q1887]

Hypatia

All formal dogmatic religions are fallacious and must never be accepted by self-respecting persons as final. [Q1237]

Brian Greene

Sometimes attaining the deepest familiarity with a question is our best substitute for actually having the answer. [Q740]

Senator Paul Simon

In the arena of religion — as well as politics — it is sometimes too easy to say with certitude, "I'm right and you're wrong," and then slip into saying, "I'm good and you're bad." The later leads to intolerance and bloodshed. [Q1697]

Marshall McLuhan

I wouldn't have seen it if I hadn't believed it. [Q1460]

Deirdre Sullivan

My real battle is doing good versus doing nothing at all. [Q242]

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Life is a journey, not a destination. [Q1609]

Plutarch

Silence at the proper season is wisdom, and better than any speech. [Q784]

Nikola Tesla

The scientific man does not aim at an immediate result. He does not expect that his advanced ideas will be readily taken up. His work is like that of the planter — for the future. His duty is to lay the foundation for those who are to come, and point the way. He lives and labors and hopes. [Q1680]

Peter Neumann

Remember, extremism in the nondefense of moderation is not a virtue. [Q357]

John F. Kennedy

With such a peace, there will still be quarrels and conflicting interests, as there are with families and nations. World peace, like community peace, does not require that each man love his neighbor - it requires only that they live together in mutual tolerance, submitting their disputes to a just and peaceful settlement. And history teaches us that enmities between nations, as between individuals, do not last forever. [Q1277]

Ramana Maharshi

The degree of freedom from unwanted thoughts and the degree of concentration on a single thought are the measures to gauge spiritual progress. [Q1041]

Václav Havel

Isn't it the moment of most profound doubt that gives birth to new certainties? Perhaps hopelessness is the very soil that nourishes human hope; perhaps one could never find sense in life without first experiencing its absurdity. [Q1748]

Senator Paul Simon

Time is the most valuable gift any of us has been given, other than good health, I tell my student, use it ... to help others. I try to do that.

I am grateful to you as a reader for taking your valuable time to follow this personal journey, which continues. I wish you well in your journey

[Q1832]

Galileo Galilei

By denying scientific principles, one may maintain any paradox. [Q931]

Brian Kernighan

Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place. Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are, by definition, not smart enough to debug it. [Q1408]

Thomas Jefferson

This [bill] on education would [raise] the mass of the people to the high ground of moral respectability necessary to their own safety and to orderly government, and would [complete] the great object of qualifying them to secure the veritable aristoi for the trusts of government, to the exclusion of the pseudalists... I have great hope that some patriotic spirit will... call it up and make it the keystone of the arch of our government. [Q531]

Senator Paul Simon

My Christian heritage and beliefs are part of me, but through the years I have become more sensitive to the great harm that religious beliefs can cause as well as the great good they can create. [Q1687]

Swami Vivekananda

All differences in this world are of degree, and not of kind, because oneness is the secret of everything. [Q1135]

Senator Paul Simon

The position of Paul Nyholm and my brother is that the Bible is inspired and an accurate guide on Christ's life and mission and on issues of faith and morals, but does not require that a person accept creation in six days or that Methuselah lived to be 969 years old. [Q1690]

Thurgood Marshall

Our whole constitutional heritage rebels at the thought of giving government the power to control men's minds. [Q756]

Carl Sagan

If we long to believe that the stars rise and set for us, that we are the reason there is a Universe, does science do us a disservice in deflating our conceits? [Q222]

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Trust your instinct to the end, though you can render no reason. [Q424]

Al Hirschfeld

Artists are just children who refuse to put down their crayons. [Q1305]

Marshall McLuhan

Our Age of Anxiety is, in great part, the result of trying to do today's job with yesterday's tools and yesterday's concepts. [Q1469]

Thomas Jefferson

Democrats consider the people as the safest depository of power in the last resort: they cherish them, therefore, and wish to leave in them all the powers to the exercise of which they are competent. [Q1851]

David S Allen

As historians and social critics have noted, inherent in corporate liberalism is the idea that the corporation, not the individual, is at the center of protection. — Democracy, Inc — Introduction Page 7. [Q238]

Charles Dudley Warner

It is fortunate that each generation does not comprehend its own ignorance. We are thus enabled to call our ancestors barbarous. [Q722]

David S Allen

Over time, the stories journalist tell about their place in democracy have changed from claiming rights enjoyed by all citizens to rights enjoyed by a privileged professional group. — Democracy, Inc. — Introduction — Page 10 [Q240]

Henry Lawson

We shall never be understood or respected by the English until we carry our individuality to extremes, and by asserting our independence, become of sufficient consequence in their eyes to merit a closer study than they have hitherto accorded us. [Q429]

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Harder still it has proved to rule the dragon Money... A whole generation adopted false principles, and went to their graves in the belief they were enriching the country they were impoverishing. [Q2034]

Theodore Roosevelt

I am a part of everything that I have read. [Q504]

John J. Sweeney

For globalization to work for America, it must work for working people. We should measure the success of our economy by the breadth of our middle class, and the scope of opportunity offered to the poorest child to climb into that middle class. [Q439]

Abraham Joshua Heschel

God is not a hypothesis derived from logical assumptions, but an immediate insight, self-evident as light. He is not something to be sought in the darkness with the light of reason. He is the light. [Q660]

Tryon Edwards

Mystery is but another name for ignorance; if we were omniscient, all would be perfectly plain! [Q712]

Virgil

Mind moves matter. [Q1584]

Woodrow Wilson

The man who is swimming against the stream knows the strength of it. [Q748]

H. L. Mencken

A newspaper is a device for making the ignorant more ignorant and the crazy crazier. [Q1213]

Thomas Jefferson

The will of the people is the only legitimate foundation of any government, and to protect its free expression should be our first object. [Q194]

Václav Havel

We have to accept this legacy as a sin we committed against ourselves. If we accept it as such, we will understand that it is up to us all, and up to us alone to do something about it. We cannot blame the previous rulers for everything, not only because it would be untrue, but also because it would blunt the duty that each of us faces today: namely, the obligation to act independently, freely, reasonably and quickly. Let us not be mistaken: the best government in the world, the best parliament and the best president, cannot achieve much on their own. And it would be wrong to expect a general remedy from them alone. Freedom and democracy include participation and therefore responsibility from us all. [Q1789]

Adlai Stevenson

Every age needs men who will redeem the time by living with a vision of the things that are to be. [Q1647]

Jeremy Bentham

As to the evil which results from a censorship, it is impossible to measure it, for it is impossible to tell where it ends. [Q435]

Senator Paul Simon

The Illinois State Journal some time ago carried an editorial titled 'The Right to Know' suggesting Illinois enact a law similar to one in California requiring actions and deliberations of government bodies of that state be conducted in public ... I stressed over and over that the public had the right to know what decisions a public body reached and how they reached it. [Q1721]

Virgil

The world cares very little about what a man or woman knows; it is what a man or woman is able to do that counts. [Q1589]

Miles Davis

The thing to judge in any jazz artist is, does the man project and does he have ideas. [Q2054]

Galileo Galilei

We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves. [Q943]

Swami Vivekananda

Our duty is to encourage every one in his struggle to live up to his own highest idea, and strive at the same time to make the ideal as near as possible to the Truth. [Q1139]

Senator Paul Simon

There is no scarcity of people who are oppressed. There is only a scarcity of men and women with eyes clear enough to see and hearts big enough to act. [Q1898]

Wendell Berry

Ask the questions that have no answers. [Q1343]

Michael Morpurgo

It is really important that focusing on things such as spelling, punctuation, grammar and handwriting doesn't inhibit the creative flow. When I was at school there was a huge focus on copying and testing and it put me off words and stories for years. [Q2083]

Plato

Music is a moral law. It gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and charm and gaiety to life and to everything. [Q637]

Margaret Mead

Anthropology demands the open-mindedness with which one must look and listen, record in astonishment and wonder that which one would not have been able to guess. [Q947]

René Descartes

If you would be a real seeker after truth, it is necessary that at least once in your life you doubt, as far as possible, all things. [Q1118]

Scott Nesler

It's a fact that facts are misused. [Q52]

Lucretius

Pleasant it to behold great encounters of warfare arrayed over the plains, with no part of yours in peril. [Q1562]

Wendell Berry

How nations, let alone regions and communities, are to shape and protect themselves within this "global economy" is far from clear. [Q1333]

Benjamin Franklin

An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest. [Q70]

Charles Lindbergh

I believe that for permanent survival, man must balance science with other qualities of life, qualities of body and spirit as well as those of mind - qualities he cannot develop when he lets mechanics and luxury insulate him too greatly from the earth to which he was born. [Q1942]

Senator Paul Simon

When radio-evangelist Jerry Falwell's Moral Majority gave me a zero rating and Dick Kelly a 100 percent rating, and Dick was subsequently indicted and convicted, I used his rating to defend myself. When asked about my Moral Majority rating, I told reporters, "I knew I was morally imperfect, I just didn't realize the extent of my imperfection." One of the "immoral" votes I cast, according to the Moral Majority, was one for foreign aid to help poor and hungry people. [Q1731]

André Gide

Believe in those who seek the truth; doubt those who find it. [Q1522]

Edward Teller

The main purpose of science is simplicity and as we understand more things, everything is becoming simpler. [Q739]

George Washington Carver

When you can do the common things of life in an uncommon way, you will command the attention of the world. [Q316]

Charles Darwin

Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge: it is those who know little, and not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science. [Q698]

Theodore C. Sorensen

We shall listen, not lecture; learn, not threaten. We will enhance our safety by earning the respect of others and showing respect for them. In short, our foreign policy will rest on the traditional American values of restraint and empathy, not on military might. [Q2021]

Noam Chomsky

Everybody's worried about stopping terrorism. Well, there's a really easy way: stop participating in it. [Q155]

Margaret Mead

Our humanity rests upon a series of learned behaviors, woven together into patterns that are infinitely fragile and never directly inherited. [Q1428]

Senator Paul Simon

Thoughtfully re-examining positions that often are based on emotion more than anything should be part of the search for truth. And careful analysis should include looking at the context and culture and times in which those who wrote ancient documents lived. [Q1691]

Allen Klein

Your attitude is like a box of crayons that color your world. Constantly color your picture gray, and your picture will always be bleak. Try adding some bright colors to the picture by including humor, and your picture begins to lighten up. [Q1304]

Václav Havel

The recent period — and in particular the last six weeks of our peaceful revolution — has shown the enormous human, moral and spiritual potential, and the civic culture that slumbered in our society under the enforced mask of apathy. Whenever someone categorically claimed that we were this or that, I always objected that society is a very mysterious creature and that it is unwise to trust only the face it presents to you. I am happy that I was not mistaken. Everywhere in the world people wonder where those meek, humiliated, sceptical and seemingly cynical citizens of Czechoslovakia found the marvellous strength to shake the totalitarian yoke from their shoulders in several weeks, and in a decent and peaceful way. [Q1790]

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. [Q407]

Scott Nesler

In the world of discourse objectivity is little more than subjective consensus. [Q655]

Senator Paul Simon

A better-prepared workforce means higher productivity. Higher productivity results in a lower unit cost to manufacture an item. Lower costs increase the likelihood of successfully competing with products manufactured overseas. This leads to higher sales, which results in higher profits. Everyone wins-labor, management, stockholders, the government, and the dollar. [Q2061]

Galileo Galilei

If I were again beginning my studies, I would follow the advice of Plato and start with mathematics. [Q936]

Saint Francis of Assisi

Start by doing what's necessary; then do what's possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible [Q1400]

Senator Paul Simon

People in a small town want to read in their weekly newspaper the stories about a family visiting their friends in New Orleans, about a birth, about an automobile accident, about the myriad small things that never make the news of a metropolitan newspaper but are the lifeblood of community of 1,200. [Q1717]

Hypatia

Fables should be taught as fables, myths as myths, and miracles as poetic fantasies. To teach superstitions as truths is a most terrible thing. The child mind accepts and believes them, and only through great pain and perhaps tragedy can he be in after years relieved of them. [Q1404]

George Washington

... there is nothing which can better deserve your patronage, than the promotion of science and literature. Knowledge is, in every country, the surest basis of public happiness. In one in which the measures of government receive their impression so immediately from the sense of the community as in ours, it is proportionably essential. To the security of a free constitution it contributes in various ways: by convincing those who are entrusted with the public administration, that every valuable end of government is best answered by the enlightened confidence of the people; and by teaching the people themselves to know and to value their own rights; to discern and provide against invasions of them; to distinguish between oppression and the necessary exercise of lawful authority; between burthens proceeding from a disregard to their convenience, and those resulting from the inevitable exigences of society; to discriminate the spirit of liberty from that of licentiousness—cherishing the first, avoiding the last; and uniting a speedy but temperate vigilance against encroachments, with an inviolable respect to the laws. [Q1834]

Senator Paul Simon

Elijah Lovejoy's Speech

I feel, Mr. Chairman, that this is the most solemn moment of my life. I feel, I trust, in some measure the responsibilities which at this hour I sustain to these, my fellow-citizens, to the Church of which I am a minister, to my country, and to God. And let me beg of you, before I proceed further, to construe nothing I shall say as being disrespectful to this assembly. I have no such feeling; far from it. And if I do not act or speak according to their wishes at all times, it is because I cannot conscientiously do it.

It is proper I should state the whole matter, as I understand it, before this audience. I do not stand here to argue the question, as presented by the report of the committee. My only wonder is that the honourable gentleman, the chairman of that committee, for whose character I entertain great respect, though I have not the pleasure of his personal acquaintance—my only wonder is how that gentleman could have brought himself to submit such a report.

Mr. Chairman, I do not admit that it is the business of this assembly to decide whether I shall or shall not publish a newspaper in this city. The gentlemen have, as the lawyers say, made a wrong issue. I have the right to do it. I know that I have the right freely to speak and publish my sentiments, subject only to the laws of the land for the abuse of that right. This right was given me by my Maker; and is solemnly guaranteed to me by the constitution of these United States, and of this State. What I wish to know of you is, whether you will protect me in the exercise of this right; or whether, as heretofore, I am to be subjected to personal indignity and outrage. These resolutions, and the measures proposed by them, are spoken of as a compromise—a compromise between two parties. Mr. Chairman, this is not so. There is but one party here. It is simply a question whether the law shall be enforced, or whether the mob shall be allowed, as they now do, to continue to trample it under their feet, by violating with impunity the rights of an innocent individual.

Mr. Chairman, what have I to compromise? If freely to forgive those who have so greatly injured me, if to pray for their temporal and eternal happiness, if still to wish for the prosperity of your city and State, notwithstanding all the indignities I have suffered in it—if this be the compromise intended, then do I willingly make it. My rights have been shamefully, wickedly outraged; this I know, and feel, and can never forget. But I can and do freely forgive those who have done it. But if by a compromise is meant that I should cease from doing that which duty requires of me, I cannot make it. And the reason is, that I fear God more than I fear man. Think not that I would lightly go contrary to public sentiment around me. The good opinion of my fellow-men is dear to me, and I would sacrifice anything but principle to obtain their good wishes; but when they ask me to surrender this, they ask for more than I can, than I dare give. Reference is made to the fact that I offered a few days since to give up the editorship of the Observer into other hands. This is true; I did so because it was thought or said by some that perhaps the paper would be better patronised in other hands. They declined accepting my offer, however, and since then we have heard from the friends and supporters of the paper in all parts of the State. There was but one sentiment among them, and this was, that the paper could be sustained in no other hands than mine. It is also a very different question, whether I shall voluntarily, or at the request of friends, yield up my post, or whether I shall forsake it at the demand of a mob. The former I am at all times ready to do, when circumstances occur to require it, as I will never put my personal wishes or interests in competition with the cause of that Master whose minister I am. But the latter, be assured, I NEVER will do. God, in his providence, so say all my brethren, and so I think, has devolved upon me the responsibility of maintaining my ground here; and, Mr. Chairman, I am determined to do it. A voice comes to me from Maine, from Massachusetts, from Connecticut, from New York, from Pennsylvania—yea, from Kentucky, from Mississippi, from Missouri—calling upon me, in the name of all that is dear in heaven or earth, to stand fast; and by the help of God, I WILL STAND. I know I am but one, and you are many. My strength would avail but little against you all. You can crush me, if you will; but I shall die at my post, for I cannot and will not forsake it.

Why should I flee from Alton? Is not this a free State? When assailed by a mob at St. Louis, I came hither, as to the home of freedom and of the laws. The mob has pursued me here, and why should I retreat again? Where can I be safe, if not here? Have not I a right to claim the protection of the laws? What more can I have in any other place? Sir, the very act of retreating will embolden the mob to follow me wherever I go. No, sir, there is no way to escape the mob but to abandon the path of duty, and that, God helping me, I will never do.

It has been said here that my hand is against every man, and every man's hand against me. The last part of the declaration is too painfully true. I do indeed find almost every hand lifted against me; but against whom, in this place, has my hand been raised? I appeal to every individual present; whom of you have I injured? Whose character have I traduced? Whose family have I molested? Whose business have I meddled with? If any, let him rise here and testify against me. [No one answers]

And do not your resolutions say that you find nothing against my private or personal character? And does any one believe that, if there was anything to be found, it would not be found and brought forth? If in anything I have offended against the law, I am not so popular in this community as that it would be difficult to convict me. You have courts, and judges, and juries; they find nothing against me. And now you come together for the purpose of driving out a confessedly innocent man, for no cause but that he dares to think and speak as his conscience and his God dictate. Will conduct like this stand the scrutiny of your country, of posterity, above all, of the judgment-day? For remember, the Judge of that day is no respecter of persons. Pause, I beseech you, and reflect! the present excitement will soon be over; the voice of conscience will at last be heard. And in some season of honest thought, even in this world, as you review the scenes of this hour, you will be compelled to say, `He was right; he was right!'

But you have been exhorted to be lenient and compassionate, and in driving me away to affix no unnecessary disgrace upon me. Sir, I reject all such compassion. You cannot disgrace me. Scandal, and falsehood, and calumny have already done their worst. My shoulders have borne the burden till it sits easy upon them. You may hang me up as the mob hung up the individuals of Vicksburg! You may burn me at the stake, as they did McIntosh at St. Louis, or you may tar and feather me, or throw me into the Mississippi, as you have often threatened to do; but you cannot disgrace me. I, and I alone, can disgrace myself; and the deepest of all disgrace would be, at a time like this, to deny my Master by forsaking his cause. He died for me, and I were most unworthy to bear his name should I refuse, if need be, to die for him!

Again, you have been told that I have a family, who are dependent on me, and this has been given as a reason why I should be driven off as gently as possible. It is true, Mr. Chairman, I am a husband and a father; and this it is that adds the bitterest ingredient to the cup of sorrow I am called to drink. I am made to feel the wisdom of the Apostle's advice, `It is better not to marry.' I know sir, that in this contest I stake not my life only, but that of others also. I do not expect my wife will ever recover the shock received at the awful scenes through which she was called to pass at St. Charles. And how was it the other night on my return to my house? I found her driven to the garret, through fear of the mob, who were prowling round my house; and scarcely had I entered the house ere my windows were broken in by the brickbats of the mob, and she so alarmed that it was impossible for her to sleep or rest that night. I am hunted as a partridge upon the mountains; I am pursued as a felon through your streets; and to the guardian power of the law I look in vain for that protection against violence which even the vilest criminal may claim.

Yet think not that I am unhappy. Think not that I regret the choice that I have made. While all around me is violence and tumult, all is peace within. An approving conscience and the rewarding smile of God is a full recompense for all that I forego and all that I endure. Yes, sir, I enjoy a peace which nothing can destroy. I sleep sweetly and undisturbed, except when awaked by the brickbats of the mob.

No, sir, I am not unhappy. I have counted the cost and stand prepared freely to offer up my all in the service of God. Yes, sir, I am fully aware of all the sacrifices I make in here pledging myself to continue this contest to the last. (Forgive these tears—I had not intended to shed them, and they flow not for myself, but others.) But I am commanded to forsake father, and mother, and wife, and children for Jesus' sake; and as his professed disciple I stand prepared to do it. The time for fulfilling this pledge in my case, it seems to me, has come. Sir, I dare not flee away from Alton. Should I attempt it, I should feel that the angel of the Lord, with his flaming sword, was pursuing me wherever I went. It is because I fear God that I am not afraid of all who oppose me in this city. No, sir, the contest has commenced here, and here it must be finished. Before God and you all, I here pledge myself to continue it, if need be, till death. If I fall, my grave shall be made in Alton.

[Q1888]

Carl Jung

Mistakes are, after all, the foundations of truth, and if a man does not know what a thing is, it is at least an increase in knowledge if he knows what it is not. [Q257]

Christiaan Huygens

The world is my country, science is my religion. [Q1229]

Hippocrates

Healing in a matter of time, but it is sometimes also a matter of opportunity. [Q1027]

Richard Feynman

I wonder why, I wonder why,
I wonder why I wonder.
I wonder why, I wonder why,
I wonder why I wonder! [Q1903]

Epictetus

If thy brother wrongs thee, remember not so much his wrong-doing, but more than ever that he is thy brother. [Q813]

Thor Heyerdahl

A civilized nation can have no enemies, and one cannot draw a line across a map, a line that doesn't even exist in nature and say that the ugly enemy lives on the one side, and good friends live on the other. [Q1530]

John Adams (HBO Miniseries)

Our first step would be to incur a national debt. The greater the debt, the greater the credit. And to that end I have recommended to the president that Congress adopt all the debts incurred by the individual states during the war through a national bank. The idea being that if the states owe Congress money, then other nations will feel more inclined to lend it to us. — (Unite or Die[5]) Alexander Hamilton [Q1134]

Herbert Simon

Anything that gives us new knowledge gives us an opportunity to be more rational. [Q642]

Milton Friedman

Most economic fallacies derive from the tendency to assume that there is a fixed pie, that one party can gain only at the expense of another. [Q1057]

David Hume

Accuracy is, in every case, advantageous to beauty, and just reasoning to delicate sentiment. In vain would we exalt the one by depreciating the other. [Q1354]

Woodrow Wilson

Our great industrial nation is controlled by its system of credit. Therefore all of our activities are in the hands of a small group of men who chill and check true economic freedom. We have come to be one of the worst ruled, completely controlled and dominated governments in the world. No longer a government of the majority but a government of the opinion and duress of a small group of dominant men. - Attributed by the movie Ethos [Q1973]

Sophocles

Men should pledge themselves to nothing; for reflection makes a liar of their resolution. [Q1255]

Clarence Darrow

Laws should be like clothes. They should be made to fit the people they serve. [Q1104]

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